The New Zealand Open Source Society is a non-profit organisation set up to educate, advocate and advance the use of Open Source Software in New Zealand.

About us

The New Zealand Open Source Society is a non-profit organisation set up to protect, advocate and advance the use of Open Source Software in New Zealand.

NZOSS represents Open Source users, creators and contributors in New Zealand by promoting software, representing the interests of the community to Government and the education sector. It also supports community user groups.

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Community - it's us!

Free and Open Source Software exists because of, and for the benefit of a community. With FOSS, the user is the developer - the FOSS community charts its own direction and sinks or swims on its unity, enthusiasm, and ability to deliver working code.
It's simple: Free and Open Source software is what it is because of what all of us do.

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NZOSS AGM Held Online

On Sunday the NZOSS held its first AGM over the Phone and using an online form of meeting called Internet Relay Chat (IRC). IRC is the oldest form of chat technology on the Internet, predating services such as ICQ and MSN. This allowed members who were not in the main centres to attend the meeting on the same basis as other members.

The day my father blew himself up

The subtitle of the article is "Open standards, free software, and old documents", which isn't nearly as eycatching...

The message and style of delivery is a good one for those of you interested in advocacy. Very subtle but with some very good insights. Read it and add it to your repertoire.

Patent on Load Balancing Coming Soon

In February the Patent Office accepted a patent application from Microsoft patenting load balancing based on communicating about load between servers. The patent basically deals with the concept of having the load balancer server talk to the other servers to work out which one is best to give new data to. The patent dates from June 2003 where it was filed in the United States. It wasn't until a year later, in May 2004 that it was filed in New Zealand.

Computer society: Open source as a way to boost jobs

The Australian Computer Society as it happens but at least they have the right idea. The article in Computerworld has more details from the NSW ACS Chairman Anthony Wong.

Quote of the Day: "In short, implementation of open technical standards decreases risk for organisations - a key requirement for consideration by procurement officers in both the private and public sectors. Decreasing risk increases the likelihood of uptake."

Australian Government Open to Open Source

In this article at crn.com.au Patrick Callioni from the Department of Finance and Administration says that Government is open to Open Source, but that Open Source Companies need to become more reliable. "Government wants to do business, but a lot of open source companies are here today and gone tomorrow," he said. "They need to set up co-op arrangements with similar companies to back each other up. We need to see things that work and can offer a long-term proposition."

Ballmer refuses to rule out Patent War

Forbes is running an article in which it interviews Steve Ballmer. In the interview he refuses to rule out taking legal action against Linux where it infringes Microsoft intellectual property. Since the SCO case began there have been very comprehensive audits of Linux, and no copyright violations were found. However, there may be patents which are infringed.

Why we wont be talking about Open Source in the future

A very interesting article from IT-Analysis. It's written by Clay Ryder of The Sageza Group and is well worth a read.

The premise is that, just as today we don't have to ask if a system is TCP/IP capable, in the very near future Open Source software will be just as ubiquitous and 'assumed' to be part of the solution. And by the way, just as TCP/IP provided a base for the explosive growth of the network model, Open Source software will do the same for business.

Yes, I know that some network manufacturers are no longer in business but the reality is they couldn't adapt fast enough. The same will happen to software makers who don't adapt.

It's called evolution.

SSC Meeting in Wellington

NZOSS Representatives had a successful and productive meeting this morning with the New Zealand State Services Commission. The points raised by the NZOSS in response to the SSC's recent recommendation document covering the use of Open Source Software were discussed, and a means of involving input from the NZOSS in the creation of the document's successor was formulated.

In brief, the SSC regard the intial document as a starting point, and agree that some further research is needed. The NZOSS looks forward to assisting the SSC in this and other matters.

Microsoft’s Hilf says Windows more reliable than Linux

Interesting article on ITWire in Australia. Bill Hilf is the man who has reneged on speaking at the upcoming Linux World Conf & Expo in Australia, although he did manage a phone conference to the recent GOVIS Open Source Seminar.

I am always intrigued by the selective memory that marketing people have. Bills main argument is that the reason Microsoft products are so successful is that they are integrated, easy to use and tested with a wide range of products. Really? I thought it was because you coudn't buy a computer or laptop from a major vendor that didn't have Windows on it.

IBM making Billions off Linux

ComputerWorld has an article today describing how IBM made sixteen billion dollars out of services for Linux last year. Mary Ann Fisher says that there are 10,000 Linux engineers in IBM working on Linux, and IBM’s whole vision is to provide the best infrastructure that embraces open systems.

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